Categories: South Africa

A new meat identification twist

Results from a recent study show that the labelling of game meat in South Africa is very poor, with different species being substituted almost 80% of the time.

Game meat biltong is often preferred over beef because of its lower fat and cholesterol content. Researchers of an article published in BioMed Central’s open access journal Investigative Genetics used mitochondrial COI DNA barcoding and sequencing to analyse samples of game meat from supermarkets, wholesalers and other outlets in South Africa and compared them to known samples and library sequences. From 146 samples over 100 were mislabelled.

All the beef samples were correct, but for the most badly labelled case 92% of kudu was a different species. Only 24% of springbok and ostrich biltong was actually springbok or ostrich. The rest was horse, impala, hartebeest, wildebeest, waterbok, eland, gemsbok, duiker, giraffe, kangaroo, lamb, pork or beef. One sample labelled zebra was actually mountain zebra, a ‘red listed’ species threatened with extinction.

Maria Eugenia D’Amato from the University of the Western Cape said, "The delivery of unidentifiable animal carcasses to market and the general lack of regulations increases the chances of species mislabelling and fraud. This has implications for species safety, but also has cultural and religious implications.”

Read the research article on www.investigativegenetics.com

Share
Published by
Caxton Magazines

Recent Posts

  • Agribusiness
  • Featured Home Image

How African superfoods inspire local agripreneur

Indigenous African ingredients and food traditions are underrepresented on the local and international markets. Black Umbrellas Global Entrepreneur Week 2018…

14 hours ago
  • Caxton
  • South Africa
  • Use only text

OVK increases turnover despite ‘challenging conditions’

The agribusiness, OVK Group, has announced an increase of 8, 55% in turnover for the 2018/2019 financial year compared with…

15 hours ago
  • Featured Home Image
  • Letter from the editor

How to turn Africa’s food fortunes around

Should African countries fail to increase food production and processing to become at least partly self-sufficient, it will be one…

2 days ago
  • World

Brazilian cotton farmers sue Bayer for US$151 million

Cotton farmers in the Mato Grosso region in Brazil are suing Bayer in an attempt to get a US$151 million…

2 days ago
  • By Invitation
  • Featured Home Image

SA agri training needs drastic digital overhaul

Digital technologies and innovations have the potential to revolutionise the world’s food systems. This is why agricultural education and training,…

3 days ago
  • South Africa

No serious injuries reported after Astral chemical leak

A chemical leak at one of Astral’s processing plants in Olifantsfontein had resulted in the hospitalisation of 15 of the…

4 days ago