How to Crop

Caring for your sunflower crop

This week, we look at fertilisation, weed control and harvesting
How to plant and harvest a sweet potato crop

How to plant and harvest a sweet potato crop

Last week, we discussed how sweet potatoes are grown in the warm season and should be planted from October to December, although this can be extended up to March in...
History of the green bean crop

History of the green bean crop

The green bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) originated in Central and South America and there’s evidence that it has been cultivated in Mexico and Peru for thousands of years.
How to mulch

How to mulch

This week we look at materials to use as organic mulch and the advantages and disadvantages of each.

Organic fertiliser boosts soil fertility

In a world becoming more environmentally aware, using organic fertiliser is highly recommended.

Know your soil

Knowing what kind of soil you have will help you prepare it correctly - improving it and increasing yield.

Using manure on acidic soil

If your soil is acidic, simply applying manure won't improve your yield, so you need to add lime or wood ash.

Spend on technology, save on water

Gamtoos Valley's three-year drought meant farmers were only allocated 40% of their annual water quota this year. And the catchment area of the Kouga Dam got little relief, despite recent...

Getting started with carrots

Here are some guidelines regarding plant population, fertilisers and climate to get you started on carrot production.

Diseases in tomatoes

Tomatoes can be affected by many different diseases - and some, like powdery mildew, can cause serious damage.

Caring for cabbages

Cabbages are heavy feeders and need plenty of food to grow. Without enough water, the heads will dry out and taste bitter, so fertilising and watering the plants is important.

Furrow irrigation

This form of irrigation is good for row crops, such as tomatoes, cabbages, and leafy vegetables.

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Treating internal parasites in sheep

Treating internal parasites in sheep

Intestinal worms are a serious problem for communal farmers, and community management protocols have therefore become increasingly important.

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