‘Land reform is ANC’s political game’ – FF Plus

Rural Development and Land Reform minister, Gugile Nkwinti, recently presented his department’s budget in Parliament.

‘Land reform is ANC’s political game’ – FF Plus
- Advertisement -

In his budget vote speech, Nkwinti said that the allocated budget for the 2017/2018 financial year was R10,18 billion, of which more than R5,7 billion was allocated to restitution and land reform.

In his speech, Nkwinti highlighted some of the land reform challenges facing the department.

“In terms of our Land Audit, it became clear that we still needed to conduct an audit in terms of land ownership by race, gender and nationality. The latter has already been concluded, but there are still huge challenges because of gaps as a result of the absence of information in respect of institutions, such as trusts, private and public organisations and companies, as well as sectional holdings,” said Nkwinti.

- Advertisement -

Nkwinti added that he hoped that the department would soon be able to present the second phase of the land audit to Cabinet.

During the budget debate, Dr Pieter Groenewald, parliamentary leader for the Freedom Front Plus, accused the ANC of deliberately “dragging its feet” with the land reform process and playing a “political game for political gain.” Groenewald added that he had been asking for a land ownership audit since 2004.

Groenewald added that he had been asking for a land ownership audit since 2004.

“By 2015, the ANC said in its own policy documents that the second phase of the audit would be available by September 2015. Now we are already in 2017. Why has it not been announced yet?”

Groenewald also said that it suited the ANC not to relinquish land title deeds to beneficiaries.

“So far, only one out of ten title deeds of land transferred by land reform has been handed over to the new owners. That means that 90% of the title deeds are with the government. [Therefore], the state owns the land.”

Jeandré Du Preez is the newest addition to the Farmer’s Weekly team. Originating from a Riversdal farming family, she has farming in her blood. After school she furthered her studies at Stellenbosch and has been working as an agricultural journalist for the past two years. She says she feels privileged to write about an industry paramount to the survival of all South Africans and is inspired by the innovative solutions with which the farming community bridges the many challenges they face. She enjoys being able to combine work with travel and appreciates the modesty and friendliness with which South Africa’s farmers share their accomplishments. She enjoys being able to combine work with travel and appreciates the modesty and friendliness with which South Africa’s farmers share their accomplishments. If she is not writing or visiting farms, you’ll find her relaxing with a good mystery novel or exploring her other passions: travelling and cooking.