Educate politicians and consumers for survival’ – Bosman

Oganised agriculture must take note of the leadership change in the ANC and educate the new leaders about the importance of commercial agriculture, as far as food security and eradication of poverty is concerned, Agri SA president Lourie Bosman told delegates of the Free State agriculture congress in Bloemfontein.
Issue date : 15 August 2008

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Oganised agriculture must take note of the leadership change in the ANC and educate the new leaders about the importance of commercial agriculture, as far as food security and eradication of poverty is concerned, Agri SA president Lourie Bosman told delegates of the Free State agriculture congress in Bloemfontein. “The principle of profitability must be made very clear. It’s our right as commercial farmers to produce food at a profit and we will not apologise for it.

The demand for food is increasing dramatically and South Africa has become a net importer of food. This is a warning that should be heeded,” Bosman warns. “One of the most important current issues in Africa is food security. It is our task as organised agriculture to put the role of commercial agriculture in the foreground, with specific reference to our role in food security.” Bosman emphasised that all South African citizens are affected by agriculture in one way or another every hour of the day. “It is therefore of the utmost importance that we create networks to educate the urban masses about the role of agriculture in their daily lives.

Not only is commercial agriculture pivotal as far as food security in concerned, it also plays an important role in the alleviation of poverty by creating large numbers of job opportunities. These messages should be conveyed to the man on the street.” “I do, however, perceive changing perspectives from the government and its representatives.

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The recent statement by the minister of agriculture, Lulama Xingwana, that commercial agriculture is of core importance to Africa, is welcomed. The fact that she also said that commercial agriculture should become more involved with land reform could also indicate a change in the perspective of the authorities,” he said. – Annelie Coleman

Annelie Coleman represents Farmer’s Weekly in the Free State, North West and Northern Cape. Agriculture is in her blood. She grew up on a maize farm in the Wesselsbron district where her brother is still continuing with the family business. Annelie is passionate about the area she works in and calls it ‘God’s own country’. She’s particularly interested in beef cattle farming, especially with the indigenous African breeds. She’s an avid reader and owns a comprehensive collection of Africana covering hunting in colonial Africa, missionary history of same period, as well as Rhodesian literature.