Beef imports only small part of total consumption

A recent Agbiz report has shown that South Africa imported 140 510t of beef between 2010 and 2016.

Beef imports only small part of total consumption
- Advertisement -

“After peaking at 25 148t in 2012, beef imports declined by an average 13% per year to 16 524t in 2015, before increasing 9% to 17 970t in 2016,” the Agbiz report said.

Speaking to Farmer’s Weekly, Red Meat Producer’s Organisation (RPO) vice-chairperson, Dr Pieter Prinsloo said South Africa mainly imported lower value cuts, like offal and processed meats, which were used in products such as polony.

“The beef industry is a R300 billion [per year] industry, looking at the monetary value,  17 000t may not be [worth] much,” he said.

- Advertisement -

There was, however, an opportunity for emerging and communal producers to fill the local production deficit, according to Prinsloo.  “It is not as easy to get communal producers on their feet. It is a sociopolitical challenge, which is influenced by aspects such as land ownership and cultural practices.”

The cumulative value of beef imports between 2010 and 2016 was R4,1 billion. The main countries from which beef were imported were Namibia and Botswana, accounting for 76% of imports during this period.  Australia accounted for 12%, Uruguay 6%, New Zealand 3% and the EU 2%. A total of 56% of SA’s total beef imports was boneless beef, carcasses and half carcasses, the report said.

Australia accounted for 12%, Uruguay 6%, New Zealand 3% and the EU 2%. A total of 56% of SA’s total beef imports was boneless beef, carcasses and half carcasses, the report said.

Gerhard Uys grew up as a real city lad, but spends his free time hiking and visiting family farms. He learnt the journalism trade as a freelance writer and photographer in the lifestyle industry, but having decided that he will be a cattle farmer by the age of 45 he now indulges his passion for farming by writing about agriculture. He feels Farmer’s Weekly is a platform for both developed and emerging farmers to learn additional farming skills and therefore takes the job of relaying practical information seriously.