Joburg Fresh Produce Market hit by corruption

Fraud of more than R7,5 million was recently uncovered at the Joburg Fresh Produce Market.

Joburg Fresh Produce Market hit by corruption
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Three officials at the market and their suppliers defrauded the City by misrepresenting the quantities of goods received via the market’s procurement processes, according to the head of Johannesburg’s anti-corruption unit, General Shadrack Sibiya.

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“In one case, the cost of [the] misrepresentation amounted to R1,86 million. In another case, the Joburg Market overpaid a supplier by R5 million. The supplier in question had business interests with employees of the market,” said mayoral spokesperson Tony Taverna-Turisan.

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The three implicated officials were suspended and a case of fraud, theft and corruption against all implicated officials and suppliers was opened with the Hawks.

These revelations would not affect the almost 5 000 farmers served by the Joburg Market, according to acting CEO, Joe Mazibuko. In a statement, he said that the irregularities would not interfere with the daily operations of the market nor their ability to render quality service to their clients.

Derek Donkin, CEO of South African Subtropical Growers’ Association, told Farmer’s Weekly that the association commended the City of Johannesburg on its efforts to root out corruption at the Joburg Market.

“Corruption in any shape or form is detrimental to our society. The less we have of it, the better for us all.”

Jeandré Du Preez is the newest addition to the Farmer’s Weekly team. Originating from a Riversdal farming family, she has farming in her blood. After school she furthered her studies at Stellenbosch and has been working as an agricultural journalist for the past two years. She says she feels privileged to write about an industry paramount to the survival of all South Africans and is inspired by the innovative solutions with which the farming community bridges the many challenges they face. She enjoys being able to combine work with travel and appreciates the modesty and friendliness with which South Africa’s farmers share their accomplishments. She enjoys being able to combine work with travel and appreciates the modesty and friendliness with which South Africa’s farmers share their accomplishments. If she is not writing or visiting farms, you’ll find her relaxing with a good mystery novel or exploring her other passions: travelling and cooking.