Black and white farmers’ fortunes intrinsically linked – Motsepe

Speaking in fluent Afrikaans, billionaire mining magnate, Patrice Motsepe, said in his address at the recent Agri SA annual congress in Pretoria, that he was confident that when South Africans looked back at 2018 in 10 years’ time, they would speak about how they overcame the great challenges the country faced.

Black and white farmers’ fortunes intrinsically linked – Motsepe
Billionaire mining magnate Patrice Motsepe (far right) was one of the speakers at the recent Agri SA annual congress in Pretoria. With him on stage is (from left): Pierre Vercueil (Agri SA deputy president), Phenias Gumede (Agri SA deputy president), Dan Kriek (Agri SA president), and Omri van Zyl (CEO of Agri SA).
Photo: Denene Erasmus
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Speaking in fluent Afrikaans, billionaire mining magnate, Patrice Motsepe, said in his address at the recent Agri SA annual congress in Pretoria, that he was confident that when South Africans looked back at 2018 in 10 years’ time, they would speak about how they overcame the great challenges the country faced.

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However, for South Africa to overcome the challenges it currently faced, such as high unemployment, the country needed to follow the example set by some of the most successful countries in the world. These countries achieved success by creating a legal and regulatory environment in which the private sector felt confident to invest in.

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According to Motsepe, government and the entire farming industry should be “absolutely committed to make sure we have a significant number of black farmers who benefit from the agriculture industry”.

He added, however, that any initiative aimed at transforming the farming sector, whether private of driven by government, had to make commercial sense.

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Motsepe said that the success of black and white farmers, as well as the broader agribusiness sector, was intrinsically linked and depended on all farmers and other investors in the sector having confidence in the future of the industry. “They must be certain that their assets will be protected.

“This country has no future, none of us have a future, the elite of this country, which includes me, have no future if we fail to create a future of inclusivity for those who are marginalised and unemployed.”

He concluded by saying that no political party in any country would remain in government indefinitely if it did not create opportunities and jobs for the marginalised.

Denene hails from a sugar cane farm in Pongola, KwaZulu-Natal, but after school she relocated to the Cape Winelands to study, for many years, at the University of Stellenbosch. She worked as a journalist for Farmer’s Weekly since 2009 and in 2015 moved to Johannesburg as Deputy editor for the magazine. In 2016 she was appointed editor. Chances are the magazine won’t get rid of her soon, because the job allows her to write about two of her greatest passions – wine and politics. When she is not sitting behind her desk writing, riding around in bakkies with farmers, attending meetings in parliament or tasting new wines, you’ll most likely find her on the beach or in the kitchen trying out exotic recipes.